Graham Lau
 

"This thing is not only older than mommy...

It's older than our mother Earth."

-from Graham's talk, This Thing is Older Than Your Mom

 
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Am I just a dream within a dream?

My name is Graham. I'm an astrobiologist and a communicator of science. And, yeah, sometimes I have a beard.

The science of astrobiology seeks to understand the origins, evolution, and radiation of life in our universe. Through the tool of science, the greatest means by which we have ever explored our place in the cosmos, astrobiology addresses those age old questions of "Why are we here?" and "Are we alone in the universe?". But there's so much more to astrobiology. The quest to understand the nature of life in the universe requires an interface of the science with philosophy, sociology, art, law, and more. 

I can't help but be in awe of our universe. "Cosmobiota" is my word for describing the living matter of our universe. That's why I sometimes use the word "cosmobiologist" to describe myself. After I started using the term, I discovered that the word cosmobiology has already been in use for some time by a small number of people interested in the pseudoscience of astrology. But, hey, it definitely appears to be a term better suited to science and I like it that way.

Outside of my educational background in chemistry (A.S.), biology (B.S.), astrophysics (non-degree), geology (PH.D.), and astrobiology (Graduate Certificate), I've conducted scientific research on comparisons of metabolic genes in marine diatoms, on the collection and analysis of biota from the stratosphere, and on the geochemistry and mineralogy of a unique sulfur-rich spring system in the Arctic. I'm now developing my career as a communicator of science and a dreamer of dreams. I also enjoy writing, speaking, playing guitar, science museums, and getting out into the wild to explore our natural world. Oh, and I'm always down for a coffee and a chat!